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20131028
20131105
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is the head of the national security agency, this is his life testimony before congress. there have been no willful violations. there have been 12 other a decade. the majority of those were done in foreign space on foreigners. i think that's important to understand. for our foreign partners and our allies. we hold ourselves to that same standard. no matter if we operate here or abroad. if we do something that does not fall within an intelligence requirement, it is wrong. so we hold our people accountability and we report to this committee. as we go forward in the future, one thing we talks about, this is a tough time for nsa, where everybody says what are you doing, or why are you doing it. but leer is what we do. when we get together, we don't -- well, maybe a couple times weeweeing but we say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take the beatings, and it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today telling you why we defended these programs then having given them up, and have
the national security agency and spying on foreign allied leaders has been embarrassing for the obama administration at a time when it hardly needs more bad news. is it more than an embarrassment? should it raise alarms abroad and at home? at first glance this is a story that is less about ethics and more about power. the great power gap between the united states and other countries, even rich european ones. the most illuminating response came from the former foreign minister of france. he said in a radio interview, let's be honest. we eavesdrop, too. everyone is listening to everyone else. he went on to add, "we don't have the same means as the united states which makes us jealous." america spends tens of billions of dollars on intelligence collection. it's hard to get data to make good comparisons but it is safe to assume that washington's intelligence budget dwarfs that of other countries just as it does with defense spending. it is particularly strange that this rift should develop between the united states and its closest allies in europe. it was predictable and in fact in a sens
and whenever we found mistakes the court addressed and corrected them. the national security agency's is typically as part of the intelligence community broadly is an honorable institution. the men and women who do this work are honorable people dedicated to conducting the mission lawfully and are appalled by any wrongdoing. they too are citizens of this nation who care just as much about privacy and constitutional rights as the rest of us. they should be commended for their important work in protecting the people of the country which has been made all the more difficult by unauthorized damage of disclosure. that'll safely in the i see stand ready to work to adjust authorities to protect our privacy since civil liberties. i think their principles we already agree on. first must protect our sources targets and relationships and a better job of helping the american people understand what we do and why we do it and most importantly the recursive oversight that insures we do it correctly. third we must take every opportunity to demonstrate a commitment to respond to respecting the civil
it -- national security agency. on tuesday it provided a platform for the director of national intelens and the head of the nsa to answer critics. james clapper insisted that he was following orders on the bugging of leaders, to give the president the best information possible on his foreign counterparts. >> as long as i have been in the intelligence business, 50 years, leadership intentions, in whatever form it's expressed is kind of a basic tenant of what we are to collect and analyse. >> on recent allegations that the united states was collecting millions of phone records in france and spain, the head of the nsa offered this defense. >> this is not information we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our country, and in support of military operations. >> for the last several month, documents that the whistleblower edward snowden leaked showed a dragnet beyond france and spain. it's failed to become a major issue in washington. the bugging of angela merkel's phone received attention because the strategic impl
national security agency contractor, edward snowden, one former aide to the chancellor said that snowden has done the western world a great service and it's up to us to help him. today on "face the nation," rejecting the idea that snowden be granted any clemency. >> can he had an opportunity if what he was was a whistle blower to pick up the phone and call the house intelligence committee, the senate intelligence committee. that didn't happen. and now he's done this enormous disservice to our country and i think the answer is no clemency. >> a republican counterpart in the house also dismissed the idea. >> no, i don't see any reason. you know, we -- i wouldn't do that. >> the suspect in friday's fatal shooting of a tchl sa altsa age has been charged with murder. paul ciancia wrote a note indicating that he intended to die during the attack. he survived after being wounded by the police. >>> four prominent scientists, including james hansen, distributed a joint letter citing the need for nuclear power plants. they wrote renewables like wind and solar and biomass cannot scale up fast enoug
government stops watching us. >> former national security agency whistleblower, strake speaking saturday at the stop watching us rally. he was charged with espionage after he was suspected of revealing information about the agency's warrantless wiretapping program. original charges against him were dropped. former republican governor of new mexico gary johnson also addressed the crowd. >> the government has granted itself power that it does not have. [applause] we have to stand against this. forla merkel, thank you bringing attention to the world that the u.s. is monitoring the .ell phones of 35 world leaders thank you for allowing us to recognize that 70 million cell phone conversations in france every month are being monitored. edward snowden, thank you -- [applause] thank you for bringing to the attention of the world the fact the u.s. government, the nsa is engaged in massive information gathering. 125 billion cell phone conversations a month. judge's granting legal authority 113the nsa to monitor million verizon users. this is not due process. >> former republican governor of new me
that the national security agency is opening the laws and regulations that we put on them. we probably need to be able to have more transparency about what the foreign surveillance court is up to so that we can lay to rest the accusation that they are just a rubber stamp or that they don't actively double check what the national security agency is up to. so we have a communications challenge that we have got to get out there. that is not to say there is not substance. it is going to be debated. reasonable people can come down on either side of the debate, but that is what is going to be going on in congress this fall is trying to reconcile all of these competing interests. host: michael from las vegas, independent line, hi. caller: as i was telling the person who took my call, i ran who a chap in las vegas gave me suspicion that he might be a terrorist. i tried to call home and security, and it was impossible to get through. nobody answered the phone. i try to get a letter to them, i cannot get any communication. now, what does one do in a case like that? i had a very serious reason why thi
of the national security agency, has said that the reports about the n.s.a. tapping into google servers is not an accurate report. clearly, however, we need to have reforms of the system. we need to have more transparency. and we need to ensure that the privacy and civil liberties of americans are being safeguarded. and just today we approved a major reform bill that would l do just that. i'm very pleased that it includes an amendment that i authored with my colleague angus king from maine that will strengthen the role of the privacy and civil liberties board to do for oversight of n.s.a.'s collection programs. >> woodruff: senator, let me turn you now -- thank you for that. i want to turn you now to the republican party and there's a new nbc/"wall street journal" poll out need shows record low approval ratings for your party for the republican party. it shows approval is down for the government overall but for republicans 22% positive, 53% negative. why do you think that is? >> that's certainly a clarion call for the republicans from my party to do a lot of self-examination. i think it
on with the national security agency. because you jointly oversee the a senior member of the national security community, this is in your portfolio as well. what did you know about the collection of intelligence from communications? when did you know about it? have you discussed it with the president? do you feel it is appropriate, why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting your communications and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.? barbara, i don't discuss conversations in national security council meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations we had regarding intelligence. we are examining all of the different dynamics that are now out there and the procedures and the processes. the white house has been very clear on that. those who lead our intelligence community have been very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, our allies who cooperate with us and we cooperate with them to try to keep the world safe and to keep each other safe, to keep our nation safe. intelligence is a key
spokesperson, says, general alexander, head of the national security agency did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations chancellor merkel. the president reportedly apologized to merkel who grew up in east germany under the eyes and ears of the sassi. he said he would have stopped the bugging if he had known about it. lawmakers say new leaks from edward snowden about the u.s. intercepting phone calls from other officials are really hurting relations. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets that have been revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries where the suggestion is that we have listened in. so i think we have repair work to do. bill: brazil's president canceled a state visit over nsa leaks that indicated her phone calls had been listened to. bill? bill: what is the white house going to respond to or how will it respond now to these leaks, wendell? >> reporter: as they dribble ou
admitted for the first time that the national security agency may have overstepped the mark in its intelligence gathering. speaking at an international summit on thursday john kerry said i assure you innocent people are not being abused in this process but, yes, in some cases it has reached too far. we are going to try to make sure it doesn't happen in the future. and he added and the president is now doing a thorough review in order that nobody will have the sense of abuse. meanwhile indonesia has claims the embassys were used as spying hubs for the u.s., indonesia foreign minister and said the country is deeply concerned by the allegation. information was leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden and the prime minister said the government has not broken any laws. a worker strike in the indoe knee is a region is in the second day and demanding more pay and better conditions and unions say two million people took part on the strikes on thursday but police say the figures are much lower. thailand now where a controversial bill granting amnesty to politicians for crimes they com
officials on national security agency intelligence and surveillance programs. later, a hearing on the september shooting at the washington navy yard. >> reinforcing her reputation as a silent partner, she once was asked about her role as first lady and replied through a secretary, no comment. watch today at 11:00 a.m. on c-span. monday night our series continues. >> i was surrounded by a few of the items that kept her on the 10 best-dressed list. she worked with molly for her day outfits and this is what she wore to the st. lawrence seaway where they met prince phillip. another custom designed address is -- dress is a printed cotton fabric with many of the thousands the eisenhowers lived in during their marriage and includes the five stars for general eisenhower. she was very fond of the color pink and wore it in many different shades and styles. jackie kennedy is well known for the little black dress and here are two examples of mamie's little black dress. she always said she would never dress like an old lady. these gowns she wore in her 70's and 80's show her love of bright
more disclosures linked to the national security agency. newshour correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> in madrid the u.s. ambassador to spain james crossoes ignored shouted questions about how his meeting at the foreign ministry went. he had been summoned after the newspaper el mundo reported the nsa tracked more than 60 million phone calls in spain just from december 2012 to january 2013. meanwhile in washington members of the european parliament met with the house intelligence committee on u.s. surveillance. >> it's just about trust. for the european union to restore this trust to make sense of why the nsa surveillance was necessary, why it's so disproportionate. >> there have already been revelations that the nsa collected the phone call gait of french and german citizens and of ger pan chancellor angela merkel. over the weekend the german newspaper said merkel's phone was monitored as early as 2002. and another german paper said president obama was briefed about the effort in 2010, much earlier than previously reported. the nsa denied mr. obama was briefed that far bac
security agency tracked everyone's phone calls. in order to identify 300 suspects. we had to track according to the disclosures, 300 million people's activities. it doesn't seem right. it seems like overreach. over and over again this needs to be organized. there are legitimate uses of this. this is clearly overstep. in this particular case, we assume that there was monitoring between different computer systems. with enkrepgcryptioencryption. we can stop it. >> google is calling this overreach. you're clearly angry about this. >> we are. >> amanpour, they stake their reputations on the ability to safeguard information users here. there are a lot of people who are very upset with what they're learning. is this genuine here? is this genuine backlash we're hearing from world leaders and how this is going to impact our relationship with others? >> well, i think a lot of it is gen genuine. some of it they have to say these kinds of things because of the public outrage, the heard the google chairman say they were outraged and they've complained many times to the nsa, to congress to presi
defend the activities of the national security agency after allegations it spied on european allies. more than 40 people are killed in southern india when the overnight bus they were traveling in crashed and caught fire. they are the largest animals ever to walk the planet but how did these giant 80 ton creatures support their own weight? ♪ hello, everyone. to the airport outside paris where for hostages -- four frenchmen were being held hostage i al qaeda after three years. they have been released. no ransom was paid. they were seized by al qaeda-l where gun man in najeer they were working at a uranium mine. were kidnapped in september, 2010. they were kidnapped from a giant french uranium company. there are questions as to how the french government negotiated their release. the french government and president allende says france has ended the policy of ransoming hostages but the suspicion is that it still is the source of tension with the united states. for the good news former hostages who are back outside of paris having been released by kidnappers. --'s go to the main news within
was not aware that the national security agency was tapping the phone of agngela merkel. opposition lawmakers and pundits have seized on the white house explanations to accuse mr. obama of being a bystander president. some democrats are scratching their heads at the seeming detachment from significant matter. msnbc ran a montage of clips showing mr. obama or his aides disclaiming presidential knowledge of various issues. what do you think? what do you think about the president's accountability on these issues and others. michigan, republican, dave am a what do you think? becausei am calling people like me are rarely represented in the media in the discussion about the affordable health care. you will find us in the gems -- , the health food stores, running, jogging, doing the tour there are millions of us devoted to our health, narcissistic to a point. that is only because we are devoted to our health. -- he has. obama nerve to tell me how to stay healthy. i have catastrophic health care and that is all i need. i do not plan on getting all of these diseases that are acquired by not taking mys
on with the national security agency. mr. secretary, to start with you, because you jointly oversea the nsa and as a senior member of the national security committee, clearly, this is in your portfolio as well, so what did you know about collection of intelligence from world leaders communications whether it was data or whatever it was, what did you know about it? when did you know about it, and have you discussed it with the president and feel it appropriate? why is it appropriate? mr. minister, how worried is your government that the united states is intercepting communications, and what does this do to new zealand's trust with the u.s.. first, mr. secretary. >> barbara, i don't discuss conversations i have in national security counsel meetings. i certainly don't discuss publicly conversations that we have regarding intelligence. we are examining dynamics out there and procedures and processes, i think, the white house has been very clear on that; and i think those who lead intelligence community even very clear on that. we have great respect for our partners, allies who cooperate with us
captioning institute] >> on the next "washington journal" we discuss national security agency surveillance and intelligence programs for gathering information within the u.s. and abroad. author and global strategies managing director michael allen. fda recentat the recommendation to tighten the policy on painkillers, the most frequently prescribed drugs in the united states. we are joined by very -- barry meier. "washington journal" here on c- span. c-span, we bring public affairs offends from washington directly to you, thank you in the room at congressional hearings, white house events, reviews and conferences, and offering complete babel to gavel coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. c-span, created by the cable tv industry and funded by your local cable or satellite provider. you can watch us in hd. secretary of state john kerry spoke today at a white house summit on business investment. secretary kerry spoke about the administration's stance on free trade and the state department role in foreign business investment. it was cohosted by the u.s. commer
.s. is revealing national security agency surveillance procedures to strike the right balance between security and privacy. his comments came at a news conference this afternoon. quick question on surveillance issues. significanten coverage overseas about u.s. surveillance practices. 80% ofderstand it, about the work that the nsa does is actually outside the u.s. and basically, an government -- not governed by statute. at whether those guidelines provide any protection for foreign nationals or whether there is sufficient protection? that any assurances can be given from this government? >> as the president has indicated, and he is totally right, we are in the process of conducting a review of the surveillance activities. to make sure that we are striking an appropriate balance between keeping the american people safe and our allies safe, and also guarding the civil liberties and privacy of those same people, who are in conversations with our partners in europe and other partners around the world to make sure that we strike the appropriate balance. there are some fundamental questions we have t
't he know? the larger question is do we have an out of control national security agency? do we have a secret government in the shadows of government that the president of the united states and elected official doesn't know about. >> so we are feeding from the south of france. hear groaning. so, mika, thank you so much for showing up and you just pop right in. god knows we need somebody defending me this morning given all the things going on. >> okay. couple of things. stwargt the bush administration so i guess you could ask if president bush knew too and put those questions to him as well. >> what started in the bush administration. >> this monitoring of phone calls. >> of foreign leaders. >> if i may -- oh, wait dew point me to talk. i can go back to the south of france. >> i want you to educate what report suggests that george w. bush tapped the phones of world leaders? >> when did this start? >> four or five years ago. >> 2002. >> 2002. >> the tapping of foreign leaders. >> yes. so you have to apply the same questions to president bush, first of all, whether they do or do not kn
of the morning. the white house is reviewing all u.s. surveillance programs after reports national security agency was spying on some 35 world leaders and the top senator on the senate intelligence committee says he is totally opposed to that surveillance and that data collection will not continue. cnn's chief national correspondent john king is here to talk more about all of this. it's pretty interesting where things have gotten with this spying controversy, john. the white house is saying they're going to review the spying policy of foreign leaders but dianne feinstein, she is not happy. she says she's been kept in the dark and wants a further review that she's going to spreer heea. >> dianne feinstein was a defender of the nsa, saying most of the intelligence gathering was necessary. but she defended most of the practices. now she's not happy. she doesn't think she's getting straight answers from the agency and sometimes the white house. she's promising tougher scrutiny. that's a signal to the administration, significantly in this latest case she put out a statement saying the administra
an organized crime, i can say this gangster is a threat to national security, and collection, but could not help us in our criminal case. 9/11, much was made about the culture of the agencies, and that was nonsense. spike and i formed partnership 1990's, and after these directives had gone out wouldcome law, nobody trust able legal, fundamental fact of our system, called the fourth amendment. when you're going to prosecute someone for a cruel case in the united states, the defendant is entitled to know how you investigate. how did you open it, what techniques did you use? wiretapping come a what was the basis of it? limited miniscule amount of information, the identity of a confidential informant that might have been used, could be withheld. defendant is a much entitled to everything. the agency is required to open the defense attorneys, to allow the defendant to see that. these directives, including the not, should did not, and will never address that. when we started to try to develop the system to work together, law enforcement and community, we were trying to figure out how this wou
with the security agencies and intelligence agencies of other nations, of allied nations. i'm not going to get into the specific alleged activities, intelligence activities, of the united states or our allies. we're obviously more broadly engaged in a review as i discussed at length yesterday of our intelligence gathering activities, mindful of the fact that because of the explosion in our technological capacities , we need to look at and make sure that we are not just gathering intelligence because we can, but we're gathering it because we need it specifically and that review is under way at the president's direction and will be completed by the end of the year. >> one of the things that officials say of the review is the surveillance of allied heads of state. is the administration's plan to conduct this review and tell the public of its outcomes all at once or is it possible that we could learn in the coming days or a shorter time frame of the decision on that specific program ahead of speed, surveillance? >> i think generally speaking you should expect it upon conclusion of the review. we w
of the national student agency. patrick kelley was the acting general counsel for the federal. of investigation and brad -- brad wiegmann was a deputy assistant attorney general at the national security vision department of justice. there are allegations in the press last week that the nsa is secretly broken into main communication links that connect yahoo! and google data centers around the world. under something called project muscular which allows the nsa and the british intelligence agency government communications headquarters, or gchq to copy data flows across fiber optic cables to carry information among the data centers of these silicon valley companies. could the panel please explain what the program is about and what impact it has on the programs that are the subject of today's hearing which is to 15 and 702 program? >> i can't address the veracity or lack there of, the details of the article but i think it's worthwhile making a few general points for everybody. even by the terms of the article itself, there's no connection to the 702 or 215 programs that we are here to discuss. i wou
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)